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How Much Is The Average UK Home Energy Bill in 2022?

Home Energy

Different properties use different amounts of energy, so bills can vary between households. However, looking at average energy usage figures and costs can help you determine whether you’re using energy efficiently and whether you are paying too much for your gas and electricity. 

With increasing energy costs in the UK in 2022, it is hard to know how much you should be paying with bills quickly getting out of control. 

In this guide, we will look at how the UK energy prices have increased throughout 2021 and into 2022 and make some suggestions on what you can do to save money in your household. 

If you would like to compare the current energy prices available on the market, try our free energy tariff comparison tool.

How Much Is The Average UK Home Energy Bill? 

Figures are still being calculated for Q1 of 2022 but we do know that the average UK energy bill at the end of December 2021 was £1,326 according to Government figures.

Once 2022 figures are released we can expect this figure to increase. Many UK households are now transitioning onto a variable energy tariff due to the validity in the energy market. This means that the majority will likely be paying more than the figure stated above. 

Can The Price Cap Help Reduce My Energy Bills? 

In terms of protection, Ofgem has managed a price cap since 2018 to ensure that consumers are paying fair prices for their energy. That cap has, for the most part, moved both up and down over the years but the recent energy crisis has since the biggest increase since it was introduced. 

Here is a full history of the energy price cap since its introduction: 

Price Cap Period 

Price Cap Level

Jan 2019 - March 2019 

£1,137

April 2019 - September 2019 

£1,254 

October 2019 - March 2020

£1,179

April 2020 - September 2020

£1,162

October 2020 - March 2021 

£1,042

April 2021 - September 2021 

£1,138

October 2021 - March 2022

£1,277

April 2022 - September 2022

£1,971 

October 2022 - December 2022

£3,549

Ofgem now review the price cap twice per year. 

Average UK Energy Bills By House Size

Of course energy prices do depend on how much your household is using. 

Energy bills tend to be much more expensive if you have a larger home. This will be a result of factors such as heating costs; with larger homes having more space to heat. The size of your home is also likely to impact expenses such as your water bill, as the more bathrooms you have, the higher your usage can be.

Here’s a breakdown of the average energy costs for homes depending on their size:

Property Size

Average KwH Usage

Average Annual Cost*

Average Monthly Bill 

1-2 bedroom house 

Gas: 8,000 kWh/ Elec: 2,000 kWh 

£1,178.16

£98.18 

3-bedroom house

Gas: 12,500 kWh/ Elec: 3,000 kWh

£1,793.21

£149.43

5-bedroom house

Gas: 18,000 kWh/ Elec: 4,500 kWh 

£2,623.66

£218.63

*Calculations based on the following kWh figures: 

  • Electricity unit rate 28.34p per kWh & 45.34p daily standing charge 
  • Gas unit rate 7.37p per kWh & 27.22p daily standing charge. 

What Are Average Electricity Bills? 

As with overall energy bills, domestic electricity bills vary considerably. However, the average UK electricity bill at the end of 2021 was £769 per year. 

This is an increase of £64 compared to 2020 and shows the current trend of the UK energy market. It is expected that the energy price cap will increase again in October 2022. 

If your bill is close to the average electricity bill of £769, it’s likely you can manage any further increases that may come later in 2022 by comparing energy tariffs today.

Average Gas Bills

At the end of 2021, the average domestic gas bills was £586. This is an increase of £34 since the previous year in 2020. 

This is despite many homes having better insulation and boiler systems improving. Energy costs remain volatile which makes it important to regularly compare energy prices. Millions of households remain on expensive gas and electricity tariffs.

Much like with electricity, the cost of the average bill is heavily dependent on usage. The more you use, the more you pay. However, the majority of household gas bills are spent on heating costs. The larger your home, the more energy is required to heat.

Compare 2022 gas prices and help keep the rising costs low.

How Energy Consumption Affects Your Energy Bills

Another key factor that impacts your energy bills is your energy consumption. This is what will be applied to your unit rate to calculate your total bill. You should aim to keep your energy usage as low as possible and find an energy deal with affordable rates.

Several factors influence the amount of energy used in your home. Here are some examples:

Number of residents – The more people that live in your home, the more energy that is used. Most energy usage tends to take place on weekends, as this is typically when most people are at home.

Time of year – Wintertime is typically when average energy bills are at their highest. Not only can energy prices increase (unless you are on a fixed rate tariff), but your usage is likely to go up as you generally spend more time at home with the heating on. Contrastingly, summertime provides a great opportunity for you to lower your energy usage and your bills. Here is some more information on the best time of year to switch energy supplier.

Appliance Use – A vast amount of your energy consumption comes from the appliances you use. To save energy, you should aim to turn appliances off when not in use.

You should pay attention to appliance power ratings and energy labels before purchase. This way, you'll get an idea of how efficient they are. As a rule of thumb, appliances that produce heat and have moving parts tend to use more energy than those that produce sound or light.

How Your Tariff Type Affects Your Home Energy Bills

The energy tariff you select for your home will have a significant impact on your bills. There are two main types of energy tariffs: fixed-rate and variable rate.


Fixed rate tariffs have unit rates that stay the same for the duration of your energy contract. Your bills will be predictable and won’t change unless there's a change in your energy use. This used to be the most desired energy tariff before many energy suppliers started to pull tariffs off the market during the UK energy crises. 

There are still some ‘good’ fixed rate tariffs available. However, it is no longer the case of finding a cheaper energy deal than the one you are currently on. The attitude has switched to managing the costs against projected energy price cap rises.

Standard rate energy tariffs have no fixed unit rates. Your energy bills could be different each month. The majority of UK households are now on this type of tariff due the the lack of availability of fixed rate tariffs. 

Will An Economy 7 Tariff Save Me Money? 

Economy 7 tariffs have unique benefits for particular types of households. An economy 7 tariff can be variable or fixed but the main difference is that they have separate unit costs for the night and day rates. They are designed for households using the majority of their energy at night or if they have storage heaters. 

The average economy 7 tariff bill in 2021 was £933 based on a household energy usage of 5,100 kWh. 

Whilst this average price largely depends on several factors, data collected by Government figures found that pre-payment customers paid more for their energy on an economy 7 tariff. 

Economy 7 On Fixed Or Variable Rates

A variable rate is subject to change at anytime. So this means your night and day rate will fluctuate. A fixed tariff on an economy 7 deal means that the day rate and night night will stay fixed at the agreed price per kWh when you agree to the the deal. 

How To Reduce Home Energy Costs?

The main way to reduce costs is to reduce consumption. This does not mean you should sit in the dark at night, but to become smarter with your energy. We understand that many more people are working from home since the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic. Placing more importance on learning to become more energy efficient.

Here some ways you can reduce your energy bills:

Control The Heating

We now have more ways than ever to control the temperature of our homes. Smart thermostats can offer the greatest control, however they can also be an expensive investment for most homes.

However, a digital thermostat can be picked up for as little as £30, allowing you to set a specific temperature for your heating. Some suppliers may even offer a free digital thermostat for switching with them. 

According to Energy Saving Trust, reducing the room temperature by just 1 degree can cut heating bills by up to £75.

Replace Lightbulbs

LED light bulbs have a huge impact bringing down electricity bills. With lower running costs, this investment could bring savings of around £180.

Switch Energy Supplier

If you haven’t switched in a while, it’s likely you will save a lot of money by switching energy supplier. Switching energy supplier is still a great way to manage your energy costs and although not practical, you can switch supplier as often as every 28 days to ensure you’re always getting a great deal.  

As energy bills increase, it's more important than ever to find the right gas and electricity deal for your home.

Invest In A New Boiler

Older boilers are less energy efficient than new models. This is a much larger consideration than just making habitual changes to save energy but it can bring in the largest savings if able to afford the upfront cost. Investing in a new boiler will make a huge difference to energy costs in your home. A new boiler saves you up to £315 per year on average. 

Improve Home Insulation

Upgrading loft insulation and cavity walls will provide large energy savings. You may be eligible for the Governments Green Home Grant to cover some cost. Improved insulation save you up to £315 per year on average. 

When Is The Best Time To Switch My Home Energy? 

It is good practice to compare energy deals every 6 months to ensure you are getting the best deal. Some energy suppliers may charge exit fees if you switch earlier than your contract terms. Most energy contracts are fixed for 12 months but in some cases, the savings are larger than the exit fees.

To avoid forgetting, add a reminder to your calendar 49 days before your contract end date. Suppliers cannot charge you any exit fees if you start the switching process during this window.

With Love Energy Savings, finding a great energy deal is simple. To find out how much you could save, just complete our quick home energy comparison calculator.

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